Peculiar Foods

by Judith Huang, age 9
Peculiar Foods

“I ran like the wind. It was Sunday afternoon, and my sister’s flock of parrots, rabbits, turtles, guinea pigs, lizards, and goats had somehow escaped from their cage that had ten tight locks on it. I was boiling mad at Daria because she knew that her animals were always attacking me whenever I didn’t give them a potato, ham, egg, and yarn sandwich.”

I ran like the wind. It was Sunday afternoon, and my sister’s flock of parrots, rabbits, turtles, guinea pigs, lizards, and goats had somehow escaped from their cage that had ten tight locks on it. I was boiling mad at Daria because she knew that her animals were always attacking me whenever I didn’t give them a potato, ham, egg, and yarn sandwich. I locked myself inside my animal-proof room and plopped onto the bed. Daria’s animals could not stand garlic, so I just sprinkled a bunch of garlic pepper.

It was a pretty good idea because I liked the smell of garlic pepper. I looked out the window and watched as the animals chased each other around in a circle. Suddenly, Adeline, one of the lizards, vanished into thin air! I yanked the door open and ran down the stairs.

Daria was calling “Adeline!” over and over, but there was no response.

I knew that Adeline was Daria’s favorite lizard, so I put my arm around her and said, “She’ll come back.”

I assured her even though I wasn’t so sure. I screamed. Daria had just vanished out of thin air, just like Adeline.

“Daria! Where are you?” I cried as loud as I could.

I was really nervous because if my parents found out, they’d think she was kidnapped and that would make everything worse.

“I’m still here, you fool,” came a voice behind me.
I spun around, but there was nobody there. Did she turn into a ghost or something? I wondered.

“I’m just invisible,” the voice (I assumed it was Daria) said.

“How?” I asked curiously.

“Do you see invisible stuff?” I asked, curiouser.

“Is it fun being invisible?” I asked, now very curious.

I began to shower her with questions.

“Eleanore, stop asking so much questions. First, I am holding Adeline. Second, it’s really boring to be invisible.”

Daria’s answers were so boring. I thought they would be really cool like those mystery books I was reading. I decided to get some snacks because I hadn’t eaten lunch yet. I ate the cookies my mom made yesterday. She had said that she put a “very special” recipe in it. After I finished, I looked at my pants to see if there were any crumbs on them. I gasped as my pants turned invisible, and I saw Daria and Adeline reading Charlotte’s Web near the window.

“Why didn’t you tell me those cookies turned you invisible?” I asked her.

“Mom wanted you to appreciate her cooking more, so she baked the cookies and hoped you would eat them and not complain about her whipped cream lasagna,” she answered casually.

“It’s disgusting!” I protested.

“I agree,” she said.

“You didn’t tell me how to get back to normal yet,” I reminded her.

“Well, you are not going to like it. Eat a potato, ham, egg, and yarn sandwich,” she grinned.

I forgot to think about how disgusting it was until I took a bite of it. I immediately threw up and chugged down some water.

“I kept telling you that I had a bottle of potato, ham, egg, and yarn sandwich smoothie.” Daria said.

I wanted to throw up again, so I drank some more water.

“That is so gross!” I commented.

Our mom came downstairs and saw the empty cookie plate.

“Did you like the cookies?” she smiled slyly.

“Let’s just say no. Actually, it is kind of cool because we could stop criminals from robbing stores and banks! And we could scare people on Halloween!” I cheered.

“Don’t get your hopes too high. Those cookies take a long time to make because it’s hard to get the ingredients. And if you are going to ask how I made them, I’ll tell you when it’s time.”

“Awww, why?” I asked while my shoulders slumped.

“Because if I tell you, then you will make it every day, and I’ll have to spend about three hours looking for you!” she replied like it was the most obvious thing in the world.

“Well, I guess I would,” I admitted, giggling a bit.

“Just go outside and do your daily exercise,” she sighed.

I leaped out the door and got out my jump rope. I hopped like a kangaroo for about two minutes. I checked the jump rope’s handle. It read 149. I hopped some more, but this time I wasn’t thinking about how many jumps left until I got to 250.

I was thinking about how to make the cookies. Why can’t Mom tell me how to make them? I wondered. Doesn’t she want me to be successful and famous for being clever? Suddenly, an idea popped into my head. I stumbled over the jump rope and fell on my face (by accident.) I rushed into the house and began to get out my ingredients for my idea.

“What are you doing?” Daria asked, coming over to me, stroking Mittens (her kitten.)

I just smiled slyly and returned to planning out my idea.

“Oh no! You can’t be!” she cried, realizing what I was doing.

She rubbed her head and strutted away feeling confused.

“What are you doing?” my mom asked curiously.

“I’m baking a cake,” I lied.

“Oh,” she said, feeling disappointed, “I thought you were making dinner,” she replied.

I stared into the pot as purple smoke came steaming out. This is going to be fun, I thought.

 

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